Tagged: research

Social Scorecard: Big Data Vendors Who Make the Grade

As social channels continue to feed the big data hype machine, I figured it would be insightful to fire up my favorite social search tool to see which vendors are making the grade (or dominating the conversation) when it comes to social discussions. This post summarizes what I found after a couple evenings of analysis, so it’s not meant to be exhaustive by any stretch, but hopefully provides some interesting insights – and a starting point for further analysis.  Thanks for checking it out!

For a first cut, I used Topsy, an excellent search tool we’ve used for social strategy projects at The Pulse, and took a look at mentions of the hashtag #bigdata along with 35 of the top vendors in the space (e.g., #bigdata AND Google) over a 30 day period ending before the end of November, from ALL sources (links, Tweets, Photos, Videos, Experts) on Twitter. Not surprisingly, IBM is dominating the discussion, with over 1000 mentions, followed by EMC (381), SAP (375), Google (355) and Microsoft (310).

Among upstarts, Cloudera was right behind Oracle and HP at 158 mentions, with Splunk (72) and MapR (58) getting their share of social buzz. Interestingly, some much bigger players like Hitachi (only 15 mentions), Xerox (8) and Fujitsu (8) are failing to generate much social chatter related to big data – at least on Twitter.

Here is the full roundup:

To get a better view of social activity weighted by resources I compared the social mentions to the latest vendor data from Wikibon – and more specifically looked at the ‘mentions’ rank vs the revenues rank. So IBM, with the top social mentions AND the top revenue, was right at mid-table (or ‘0’). While standouts (largest difference between social rank and revenue rank – what I’ll call ‘Social IQ’) were QlikTech, Tableau, MapR and Cloudera. Perhaps not a surprise since all are relatively young/small, but well-funded and clearly hitting the social trail big time.

Perhaps a surprise in this cut of the analysis is the strong performance of Microsoft, Oracle, SAP and EMC, showing that all are getting the word out and associating their offering with the big data movement. Note that if a vendor was not included in Wikibon they won’t be in the following chart!

Here’s the full results for the Social IQ of the top big data vendors based on mentions vs revenues rank:

So, who are the ‘social stars’ at this point? Among big companies, IBM, EMC, SAP, Microsoft and Oracle stand out.  And among upstarts, clearly QlikTech, Tableau and Cloudera are making the grade.

I’d love to hear your thoughts on other vendors I should include in this study. And please suggest other measures as well for the next cut at the analysis. Thanks again for stopping by!

Advertisements

A Small View of Big Data

Large organizations are in love with big data and big analytics. In fact, back in March, IDC forecast that the big data technology and services market is expected to grow from $3.2 billion in 2010 to $16.9 billion in 2015, while it’s been reported that Deloitte estimates the size of the big data market at $1.3-$1.5 billion in 2012. Yet many employees aren’t equipped to harness these insights in their everyday decision making. And perhaps even worse, many executives and boards are still oriented towards an ‘inside’ data view vs customer or employee engagement type data that has increasing value as social and mobile networks take off, as Barry Libert argues.

Meanwhile, in the consumer world, brands like Amazon, Apple and Nike are shifting their own big data engines into high gear to deliver more personalized offers, recommendations and experiences that drive loyalty and sales.

What’s the connection? While companies (and computers!) like big data. Most people only need small data. Not only in terms of what is ‘good enough’ when it comes to the size of the data set. But also in terms of:

  1. Delivering simple, consumer-style, self-service apps and devices vs. complex toolkits,
  2. Providing context-driven, highly accurate answers and explanations (note I said answers, not data),
  3. Applying the latest Responsive Web Design and social marketing techniques to deliver a great experience across all Web-enabled devices and sharing channels.

Google may do this better than anyone currently when it comes to consumer applications. And on the business front, one can argue that Salesforce has done the best job to-date blending enterprise functionality with social insights and Web-style ease of use to create CRM solutions that your typical employee actually wants to use.

Of course other vendors, brands and investors can benefit from this small data approach, if they focus on creating simple, smart, responsive, socially aware tools and solutions.

Who is driving this small data revolution – even if they don’t know it yet?  In terms of tools, my list would start with the new generation of speciality social analytics and business intelligence providers like Bluefin Labs, GoodData, NetBase, QlikTech, and Visible Technologies.  In future posts I plan to explore these companies and other vendor categories, look at the role of rich media in both creating and delivering insights to the right audience, and highlight organizations like Nike who are leading the way in taking a small, localized view of big data.  I look forward to hearing your thoughts and welcome recommendations on who I should spotlight in future posts.

thanks for stopping by!

Allen